Mending the Circle

Mending the Circle

sponsThe history of Turtle Island is fraught with trauma, deprivations, land stealing, and genocide. The impact of historical events, including positive elements, affect all who live here, albeit with different and often unacknowledged impact. We seek to utilize our common history for the purpose of addressing in a positive way the challenges posed. To do this we must include recognition, generally overlooked, that Indian practices and traditions in food, medicine, ecology, government, engineering, cosmology, and environment have been substantial.

Those contributions have been even more critical in terms of Indian implementation of positive child development traditions and models based on practice evidence. How we are identified to others is unsettled. Each tribal community or nation has its own name and language, which almost invariably translates into “people,” perhaps with some adjective attached to indicate a particular cultural significance. Collectively we may be referred to as Native Americans, Indians, First Nations, indigenous, aboriginal, or other assignations. We use many of these terms at different times. The point is we are referring to the “people” who were living here when Columbus arrived.

The programs and services offered by Turtle Island Learning Circle come from our experiences living in America with its Native-indigenous and Euro-American split personality. While recognizing the mixed-cultural heritage of many of our practitioners and teachers, as well as our “pure” bloods on both sides, we strive to present a fair and balanced perspective.

We are not interested in assigning blame or promoting shame. We just want lessons to be learned from our shared history.